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Move Less ... Get Good!

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davew
I am thinking that the 'get good' methodology would be suited to stiff shaft's more than a conventional swing. This is because with our 'get good' approach the shaft is effectively clamped at the wrist (no movement required) and the acceleration of the club will bend the club shaft more than a conventional swing where the wrists are flexible. Therefore for improved accuracy a stiff shaft would be better assuming that the correct weight is available. What do you think Ross, Cheer's davew
Ross
I agree.

Golf is about two variables, distance and direction.  The whole game is about these two concepts and every golfer is trying to improve one or the other (or both).

I know that a stiffer shaft improves direction and gives useful feedback when misused.

With the Traditional (stop at the ball and throw the club head) golf swing, the stiffer shaft, will not be very forgiving and not feel* as easy to hit as a softer flex.  Now, most seniors have been told that they could get more distance if they used a regular flex or senior flex (or A flex with women).  What those flexes do, is give a whip effect to the club head, that may or may not give a little more distance (depending on timing**).  My experience is, they mostly make the misses more dramatic and will usually sacrifice direction.

*Remember golf is about distance and direction, not about feel.  The shot will feel great when you impact the ball with the shaft in line with your front arm and hit the sweet spot of a square club face.  Repeatability comes when there are less variables and that usually means less movement and less movement feels terrible (until it produces awesome, repeatable, solid shots and builds confidence).

**Most golfers will throw the club head too soon and the whip effect happens before the club head gets to the ball (reducing club head speed into the ball), and closing the club face for a pulled, hook or miss hit.

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horstie
Does that mean that the shafts in all clubs should be steel? My whole set has graphite shafts.
Ross
No, you should use what you like and what you believe lets you play your best.  It is not about the kind of shaft, it is about the flex (more flexible vs. less flexible). 

More flexible (senior/regular) = maybe a little more distance* and maybe at the sacrifice of direction
Less flexible (stiff) = better direction

I think, the ideal way to know what is best for you, is to experiment (at the range or course), with with different shafts, that all have the same club head and make the determination yourself.  This approach used to be available years back, but now with technology the way it is, it is more cost effective to just measure the golfer and tell him what he needs vs. (make available) a dozen 6 irons with various shafts/lengths etc. for the golfer to go try. When it all shakes out, for you to perform at your best, YOU have to believe, the club that is in your hand is the best for you for distance and direction.  If it "Feels" good too, that is just a bonus. Perimeter weighted club heads, feel better than blades when miss-hit.  But trap the ball (with any club), on the sweet spot with a square face and life is good.  All clubs feel good if hit correctly.

* You may get a little added distance if club head is allowed to "flip" at the ball (not what we do with my method).  Now, if you don't allow the club head to flip, the club head may lag way behind because the shaft is not "keeping up" and you might block the shot, or start having to throw the club head to catch up.  

Remember, we trap the ball with the entire body/arms working together as we rotate through impact.

Move Less ... Get Good!   

DUPLESSISGOLF
horstie
Ross, the reason why I was asking the question is that I had a set of irons made up by a local club maker here in Niagara Falls Canada. During the fitting session( computer analysis) he determined that I would get more "whipping" action with the graphite shaft. Of course,using your method, there is no desire to have one. I still have my Adams OS set where only iron #4 and5 are graphite. I took this set out yesterday using your method, as I was using the free swinging Mehlhorn swing being fitted with my new set, I almost felt that I was getting better results with with my Adams( the club head seems heavier and has a wider sole).
Now I am questioning my decision getting new clubs.

Ross
I try not to talk too much about clubs/fitting, because there are so many variables and I don't endorse any products.  I also don't like design compensations to try to help or make up for swing flaws. Everything is a trade off.  If we just learn to get the swing right, we can hit any club! 

Like I said, I think experimentation on the range or course, is the best way for you to know, that the clubs you decided on, give you the results you want.

Move Less ... Get Good!   

DUPLESSISGOLF
horstie
Thanks for the clarification. With all the advertisement and claims on technology by the golf club mfg.in the last 10 years (and I admit, I fell into their trap many times) , people who never played golf before should be able to hit 250 yard drives on their first attempt.
Horst
larry
I recently found myself hitting weak push fades(with my old swing) so i went to a top 100 club fitter. He determined I was early extending and suggested I switch to graphite shafts(for increased club head speed) and two degrees more upright lie angle. Ping black dots had fit me for 25 years, now I play yellow dot and Steelfiber stiff shafts. What a great change! But I knew I needed to do more so I changed to Ross swing. Best change of all! Done correctly i don't think early extension is possible. Now I hit a tiny draw with a medium trajectory and greater consistency. More fairways hit and greens in regulation. Lesson: don't be afraid of change. Thanks Ross!
Ross
That is great Larry! I'm curious, when he changed your "lie angle", did you hit off of a board with tape on the bottom of the club head?  The impact mark made along the sole of the club, should have been right in the middle, not towards the toe or heel.

Move Less ... Get Good!   

DUPLESSISGOLF
larry
No lie board, this fitting was done using Trackman. After hitting my clubs (Ping G20 black dot steel R shaft) I hit a Ping G20 yellow dot six iron with steel R shaft. Immediate improvement. More solid contact, ball direction and trajectory. The fitter suggested I go to a graphite shaft as my club head speed was low. I'm 72 so I new I had been losing distance for some time. I was going to buy new clubs as he is a Ping dealer but he then had me try the same club head but with a Aerotech Steelfiber graphite shaft. I loved the feel and picked up 3 to 4 yards in distance. I was surprised that it was a stiff shaft. I had tried graphite shafted irons in the past and found I had to use stiff shafts in them. The fitter said my club heads were as good as any currently made so we sent them to the factory for bending and he installed the graphite shafts. Then I discovered your swing. These changes have reinvigorated my golf game.
Ross
Great Larry.

Move Less ... Get Good!   

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