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Anthony225 Show full post »
Ross
To find the best position of the shaft/wrists at impact Anthony... this is what we want.  However you can get there.  I think the easiest is to setup with it, and maintain it, using the shoulders only, then return through impact and it has not changed.  This takes some work, but the results are awesome, and it forces you to use the Large Muscles to accomplish it.  Here is a great way to find how your wrists and the shaft should be at impact.

Setup with a club, but without a ball.  Now, if you were to unwind slightly from setup (this is turning through impact), and "drag" the club along the ground... you will find the best, strongest, most powerful position(s) of the wrists.  Just drag the club around to the "left" (right hander), via the body's rotation.  This is a great drill and will automatically align the shaft and wrists.  Drag the club and try to "straighten" it out using the back hand while your dragging it... not powerful or repeatable.

So, the answer is no, the club does not straighten some, because it's being dragged, and there's a slight lag in the club head, as the arms/club are being pulled around to the left while unwinding.  If you are straightening out the club at impact, you are flipping... usually with the back hand throwing... not good.

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Anthony225
Ok. So just to be sure, the angle you explained above is the angle the club makes in front of the body and not the the angle made by keeping the back wrist bent back. In other words the angle you make if your wrist brought the club from address straight up towards your nose. I don't know what that is called....
DaveF
Thanks Ross. I regressed/made things complicated. Hit it great today though.
Ross
This is answering Anthony's last question:

No, I am not talking about the wrist angles at the base of your thumbs.  
Here are a couple photos.  Back wrist bent "in" holding and front wrist "flat" or "bowed out".  Those are the angles I'm talking about.  This "shape" is what we drag through using our body's rotation.  This is essential to produce a solid shot.  If the back wrist has straightened out too soon... or is "flat" at impact, the shot will be thin, flipped, topped or left in many cases. 

Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 5.24.35 AM.png Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 5.27.28 AM.png

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Anthony225
Gotcha. So the angle at the base of the thumbs....does that angle stay the same from start to finish? It's hard to tell when watching someone swing if this (vertical?) setup angle is maintained though the back swing and downswing.
Ross
Actually no.  You can't hold that angle.  When the club is traveling at X mph through impact, the shaft actually bows down a little, and the base of the thumbs at the wrists, raise up a bit, due to the club head being pulled down by the inertia.  This is way too much to think about, but it does answer your question.  Also, it is why you see the toe of the club more off the ground at setup on longer clubs.  The toe has to start that way, because through impact with the bowing down of the shaft, and wrists raising, the toe would dig in to the ground through impact if there wasn't some prior compensation.

If you start with too much angle (at the base of the thumbs), at setup (usually due to too much tilt from bending over), you will get into trouble because you can't hold it and it WILL change.

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DaveF
I worked on the abbreviated shoulder turn last weekend and got a feel for the hip powered downswing, and turning everything left to the finish without any arm intervention. WOW! What a difference from what I've been doing.
Feels like "the hips are the engine and the transmission, the shoulders/chest are the back wheels". Going to take it easy on the gas until I get some miles in lol.
Ross
Great... sounds like you are definitely on to it!  Sometimes you hear something over and over and think you've got it... and then one day it really lights up.  Put it in your notes to come back to if you're struggling.  It is easy to slip back... especially towards the end of the round.

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DaveF
The drill revealed to me that the hips/knees can turn more level and still pull the shoulders around the spine, like how a U joint works. I was using the hips to "help" the right shoulder to the ball, and getting stuck as a result. I've made the leap to focusing on hip turn and not the shoulders. Took me a while, not having played any sports that might have facilitated that. Having said that, I know a couple of retired MLB players who have great hip turn, but struggle to keep their arms connected.
Ross
They need the "Ross Move" for baseball... and to get their weight forward, so they can rotate.  Most baseball players have their weight evenly distributed, so they can use their arms and hands to hit.

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DaveF
Started bringing the swing to the course the last couple of rounds and yesterday it really started clicking. I had Birdie putts on all but one par 3 (including a blind tee shot to 3' with 5W). With a little luck birdied from 130 Yds on a hole that everyone else 3 putted. Nothing like spending several minutes looking for your ball off of a sloping narrow green thinking it HAD to have rolled off, and to then have one of your partners ask "is this your ball in the hole?"
Too much club on 3 approach shots, which was a nice problem to have, that's an easy adjustment though lol.
Ross
What fun Dave! That too much club is a great sign when you start to understand and trust the swing.  WTG.

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DaveF
Certainly appreciating the difficulty level more and more. So little room for error in the golf swing.

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