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Anthony225
Ross,
Which type of clubs work best with your method? Hybrids, woods, irons, or utility? Maybe some of you students have had better success with one or the other.
Ross

I does not matter since our goal is to repeatedly meet the "sweet spot" AKA "Center of Percussion" of the club face.  If/when done, ALL clubs feel great and work.  It is when you miss this spot, you'll feel and experience the effects of that particular design.

You want to use the clubs "you" like the best.  This is the more important psychological factor.  You have to believe that the club in your hand, is the best you've hit, that will get the job done... not clubs a "sales person" wanted to sell you, or what is "new" and comes with a "sales pitch" of mumbo, jumbo technology terms or worse a "big discount".  Now, if you happen to get a big discount on the clubs you really like, GREAT!

I would say one thing about design that I know does not work (as well) with my method... that is "Offset Hosels".  Offset Hosels are a compensation, to manipulate the club head and for a right hander, will make the ball want to go left.  You'll fight the club head wanting to turnover.  It does not mean you can't learn to control the club head, just that it is more difficult to do (I believe).  I love(d) my old Ping Eye 2s, but as my method developed, I realized they were hurting me and went to Hogan Blades.  I didn't hit them quit as far, but hit them where I wanted, and was more consistent with distance.  I also knew that if the ball when left, it was because of "me" (flip or lack of turn), not the club.  Again, personal preference... use what you believe in.


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Anthony225
Ok. The reason I asked is because with most traditional methods of the golf swing there is rotation of the club through impact which seems to attribute to difficulty controlling certain types of clubs for some people. With your method the club is dragged through impact and there is no timing of club rotation involved. So I was wondering that if a golfer did not have to worry about the problems created through club rotation, which type of club could he take advantage of that would maximize his results with your method regarding distance and accuracy. Woods, hybrids, utility irons, blades, cavity backs....
Ross
There are many factors and trade-offs.  There are many different kinds of club designs that can achieve the same result.  Golfers at different stages of development, age, flexibility etc., should experiment with different types of clubs to find what is right for them.  You have to believe that the club in you hand is best club (for you), to get the job done.  The best way to know is to experiment until you find what you trust.  I don't think there is a one-club fits, all or is better... it is about confidence and using what you have to get the result you're after.



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carlgo
I would like to try out a set of those one-length, lie, etc clubs some day. Might go well with the Duplessis method. 
Anthony225
I was thinking the same thing! A repeatable method with repeatable golf clubs!
carlgo
I cut some clubs down to a 7 iron length and put on big grips. It is better for me, but of course they are still of different lies, weights, etc so it isn't the same thing. Does seem to validate the idea though. 
Anthony225
From what I have read you have to have the same Clubhead weights and lie angle for each club to take full advantage. You also need the loft angles adjusted or your distance will be off.
Ross
One thing to remember is, the length of the shaft changes the distances.  Theoretically, the longer the shaft, the farther the ball flight, but the greater the margin of error.  So, if you only have one length (like 7 iron let's say), the club face angles like 3 iron are going to suffer on distance.  Trade-offs.

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Anthony225
That's something to consider. The strength of the Ross method is consistency regardless of the club. Shorter clubs may not be as beneficial as it would be for less consistent swing styles.
carlgo
The company retort to the statement that shorter clubs will adversely affect distance is that if the club and arm are indeed one and straight, from the shoulder socket to the club head, taking off an inch or so is a tiny fraction of that and will not be a problem. Of course the company also promotes the idea that, like the Ross method, you get more solid and consistence hits.
Dan
Ross,
Here’s the situation, you’re ball is sitting on the hard pan, you’ve got a shot back to the fairway but you have to keep it under the branches of the trees for ten yards and another five yards to the fairway. Usually I use my 3 iron to keep it down under the branches. What would you do? Thanks.
Ross
Hi Dan

I like your 3 iron idea.  You can also close the face a bit before you grip to deloft the face if you think you need it.  Make sure you hit ball first and keep the shaft in line with your front arm (no flip).  If the branches are very low you could also consider putter.  Most importantly, pick a shot that you know will work and will get you out of trouble.

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Dan
Thanks Ross,
I hadn’t thought of using the putter. I hate scuffing my irons on the hard pan. I guess the best thing to do is stay in the fairway. Hah
Ross
Haha.  Really [wink]

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