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dlagoy
I have always had trouble with fat shots. What I discovered today is that I was allowing a little slack in my arms on the back swing. Then on the down swing I was extending my arms fully causing the fat shots. I have found that if I keep the "template" with extended arms on the back swing, I return back to the ball perfectly thus avoiding the fat shot. Details are important.
Ross
You're on to it for sure.  That front arm is straight on the backswing and downswing until after impact... then the back arm straightens.  Keeping the elbows close, working towards each other helps this too.

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Dan
Ross,
How do I learn how to keep my right arm straight on the backswing? You used to say, “I get lazy and that later on we would work on keeping my arm straight.” Ok, it’s later on... so what can I do?
Thanks,
Dan
Ross
Hi Dan
First for others reading, you're a "lefty" (left handed), so your "right" arm is the "front" arm (closest to the target).

It takes work to maintain a straight front arm from the beginning of the takeaway, to the top of the backswing, and back down through impact a bit... then the front elbow should bend down as the back arm straightens.

One component that makes it easier to maintain a straight(er) front arm, is to make sure the "shoulders" are controlling and turning correctly right from the start.  Many golfers turn their shoulders a little, then let the arms take over and lift.  This can result in the front arm bending.  This can happen if you're not warmed up or later in the round when the body gets tired.  Letting the arms lift is kind of a "fake" windup (no power).  Any lifting in the backswing can cause big problems for the downswing.    The shoulders must start and control all of the backswing*.  If needed for a full swing, the shoulders turning eventually turn the hips a little on the backswing.

* The shoulders turn 90° around the spine.  They do not move up and down. 

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ed256
Hi Ross

By keeping the arms together and just turning the shoulders is this a better way to keep the lead arm straight? do I have to create width?

Thanks


Eddie
Ross
I'm not sure it is better than what you are now doing, but it can help keep the front arm straight.  Using the shoulders can help maintain width if your front arm does not bend on the backswing.  Keep in mind the "back" arm does bend a little on the backswing... as does the "front" arm after impact.

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Dan
After some practice, it looks like there’s no easy way to keep the lead arm straight. It’s going to take some work and time before it feels comfortable and natural. On top of trying to feel comfortable with a straight arm, there’s an urge to GO at the top of the backswing with no pause. It’s just going to take some work. I think the pay off should be a little more distance. I’m hoping for the best.
Ross
The payoff should be more solid contact and more consistent locationsiTe200#@! on the club face.

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