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Anthony225
I've been focusing on my short game more lately now that I can keep the ball in play more often with my driver and irons. I understand that you advocate using a 56 degree wedge for shots 50 yards and in. Do you feel that manipulating (open or closed) the 56 for various shot effects (run or high shot) is more repeatable than using for example a 7 iron for bump and run or a 60 degree for high shots?
Ross
You want to be flexible on the course. To have more than one kind of shot around the green is very important for learning to get "up and down".  SW is the most flexible club in your bag (once learned).  Many golfers are afraid of SW (and they should be if they throw/release the club head of SW around the green (Skulled or Chunked in a hear beat).  Once they learn to maintain the setup shape and rotate, WOW dozens of creative shots are available!  You start to "lick your chops" around the green thinking you can "make it" from anywhere off the green.

I will say.. if you like a club, and you know how it performs, use it !!  When you're playing, on the course, you use/do what ever you believe will give you the best chance to get the job done.  On the course you're playing for "score" and following your "routine"*.  Never try a "new" shot on the course when things really matter or under pressure.  It is critical to protect your confidence in golf, so always play the shot you know.

* Like "what you eat you are"... "what you practice/repeat is what you get".  Let's say you go out on the course to practice, then hit a shot you don't like... so you throw down another ball and try again and still didn't like it .... so you're now a little frustrated and rush to throw down a 3rd ball and you're worried there is something wrong you can't fix... so you hit the 3rd (without your routine) to try to get your confidence back, and end up hitting the 3rd shot worse than the first 2.  Wow, now you've really gone backwards with the confidence.  What was just "programmed"? 

Two days later you're with your friends (on the course for the real game), ... get to the same shot you missed 3 times... what do you suppose is going to happen?  Moral:  Practice at the range... Find time to also practice your "routine" at the range ... AND ...when on the course, take every shot using your routine (or don't take it).  Better yet... if you miss a shot on the course, don't take a second shot trying to fix it (and your confidence)... think about it some ... then do some well though out practice at the range, after the round, when the "missed shot" from the course isn't fresh in your mind.

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Anthony225
The routine for all shots makes sense. I actually am starting to really like the SW. I've been hitting it in my backyard over my neighbors fence. (He doesn't care). I hit on both thick grass, low grass, and bare dirt. I hit out of divots also. For flop/high shots I see how close I can stand to my neighbors fence and still hit it over. The hard bare dirt shot can expose swing faults quickly!
Ross
Oh, you are on to it.  That kind of practice really pays off.  I had a tree in my yard and would pick a hole between branches to practice height/loft control to a specific spot in the sky.  This really paid off  in many ways.  Like learning to "drop" the ball (from a point in the sky), on to the green and let the descent angle stop the ball... just like throwing under hand "up to a spot", so it would drop and stop or at least take off the forward momentum.  This teaches great "visualization" and "trust" and your body will do what your mind sees.  It does not come over night... but with practice and repetitions.

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larry
Ross, I know that the way the wedge is used is really so important in scoring. The tour pros save par or make birdie very often in a round due to their expert wedge play. Could you talk about the use of the bounce of the wedge in shots around the green and bunker? It seems to be important in shot results.
Ross
Yes... sand wedge is very important, but "bounce" is not with our method.

Bounce* helps the other kind of golf swing, where the club face/head will be passing the hands before or at impact and the bounce is necessary to help bring the club head back out of sand. Bounce can also be a big problem for "flippers".  On short grass, if you flip with a lot of bounce on the SW, it will bounce right up into the ball.

We, on the other hand, have that shaft nicely in line with the front arm, using our body rotation to bring the club head through impact (not changing it**).  If the shaft stays in line with the front arm through impact, we've essentially "removed" any bounce due to the angle of the shaft.

*Bounce is the difference between the leading edge and the trailing edge on the bottom of a sand wedge.  The more angle in degrees (°) the more the wedge will want to come up out of the sand, vs. dig into the sand  AKA "dig sole".

** We can pre-set the club face open before taking our grip for as much loft as is needed, then just turn through holding the shape for repeatability.

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lyleric
Ross, I don't see any sand video on the web site. How do you play bunker shots?
Ross
In the Advanced Shots section.  Scroll the videos.  It's towards the of the row.

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