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jtfey

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 #1 
Ross, I watched the Trapping Drill video, the one with the different speeds, about 25 times. What I realize I'm not doing well enough (among many things) is that fast turn you make without moving forward. It's something I really need to concentrate on because it should help with how much I still throw the hands.

But I do have a question. When I watch you make that backswing, there is definitely a 90-egree angle between your arms and the club shaft when you reach the top of your swing. Is it OK for that angle to increase on the backswing or should those wrist angles not change? I thought it was the latter.

Thanks.
Ross

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 #2 
We all learned "old school" to hinge and throw the club head.  I knew long ago that throwing the club head at the ball, was a bad idea and a dead end for repeatablility.... so for many years I used/and taught "constant grip pressure, with a passive hinge"  ... in other words... just keep the grip pressure constant and the hinge would happen and un-happen, on its own (hopefully the shaft would end up in a straight line with the front arm at impact).  What I really got from this was, this passive grip pressure, allowed my shoulders/body to take over the swing for more power and consistency.  It felt much more natural and athletic.  I've been finding more and more that, a little stronger, controlled grip pressure or fixed wrists, can help even more (as long as you know how to turn).  Example:  take a golfer that does not know how to turn and remove the hinge and he does not know what to do to move the ball... kind of a catch 22.  but, if he does not use his hands, he will have to learn to turn to move the ball...  and... the more you learn to turn, the more you'll keep your hands out of the swing.

So, you be the judge on your swing and the hinge concept. I know the more you hinge, the greater the chances are you will unhinge into a "flip".  Also, there is no benefit in hinging with this method since we rotate through impact... hinging/unhinging will only hold you back from learning to turn (like you mention in your first sentence).  One other big issue is... the body will stop rotating when the hands take over through impact.  I think it is better if we don't hinge (as long as the shaft was inline with the front arm at setup).  Here are some more of my thoughts on hinging:  http://duplessisgolf.com/blog/to-hinge-or-not-to-hinge/

 

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av5050

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 #3 
Ross,

Would you say that the position you originally stop at in your "Square Club Face" video is far enough (for any club) to hit a decent distance and play the game?   

Thanks 
Ross

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 #4 
I'm not sure of what you're asking in "originally stop", but this swing once learned correctly, can hit the ball very far (if needed).

First...distance does you no good if the ball goes sideways.  Keeping a square face and rotating, will hit the ball straight!  That is half the game. 

Now, hitting it farther depends on many variables and each golfer is different.  If you can, keep your weight forward, windup correctly using the shoulders on the backswing, then turn through completely (without the hands and arms breaking down in the backswing or taking over at the ball), you'll hit it very far and straight.  This takes work and repetitions and routine.  These are not quick golf tips, they're a method, when put together make golf fun.

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Michae1_B

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 #5 
Ross,

    I'm comfortable with the backswing up until the club shaft is parallel to the ground and even a little after that. What I noticed is that as you pull back, your right elbow does bend and your arms are able get really high behind your head, which I am assuming generates even more potential energy.
    Any tips for us on the form and approach of the backswing after the club shaft reaches the initial pull back to parallel with the ground? How can I get to look like you do at the top of my backswing? Thanks for your response.



Michael
Ross

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 #6 

The backswing is about efficiency, not length.  Ideally, the shoulders move first, while the lower body resists a little, to give the shoulders a head start (so to speak).  After their "head start", the shoulders continue winding and can turn the hips a bit if needed for distance.  This has created a "spring" like movement from top down.  You can use your shoulders to turn as far as they can and allow your hips to be wound up a bit too... AS LONG AS YOU DON'T LET THE HIPS START MOVING OR SLIDING ON THEIR OWN.
 


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lucky2

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 #7 
Ross. I find this whole wrist thing most confusing . Since the right elbow bends, the wrists have to hinge. Right? It seems I have to manipulate my wrists on the backswing to keep the left wrist flat at the top and not cupped. Is that proper? Thanks. Ralph.
Ross

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 #8 
- No, the wrists do not have to hinge because the back elbow bends.
- Yes, keeping the front wrist flat (or bowed out a bit - Dustin Johnson, Paul Azinger, Lee Trevino) is what we want.

At impact, on a solid golf shot, the face is square to the target line ... the front wrist is flat to slightly bowed out ... and the back wrist bent in supporting or helping hold that shape. Okay... that is what we MUST have at impact... so let's look at the options on the backswing that would give us the best chance to get the club into that position at impact.

1.  If we don't turn our shoulders, and lift the club with our arms, and allow our elbows to bend and collapse and our wrists to hinge and our bodies to slide to the back foot.  Let's see... that's at least 4 variables we've created.  The odds of trying to slide back and to realign all that is very slim.

2. So we keep our weight forward... that helps, but there's still 3 variables. 

3.  We all know that keeping the front arm straight on the backswing, will help maintain our radius (critical element) so there is a chance we can make contact at impact.  Now we're down to 2 variables.

4.  Lifting the arms is not powerful at all and is not repeatable.  If the arms lift up, they just come back down driving the club into the ground.  We can use the Shoulders instead.  The shoulders are very powerful and very repeatable, if the arms and hands to take over and ruin what they do.  Now we're down to 1 variable.

5.  The wrists hinging.  Ah yes, what everyone wants to do so they can hit at the ball.  Like an axe into a tree.  The problem with the wrists hinging is, that the more they hinge, the more "open" the club face gets, lowering the chance of getting into the position we MUST have for a solid golf shot.  For every action, there is an opposite and equal reaction... "IF YOU HINGE, YOU WILL INVARIABLY FLIP OR THROW THE CLUB HEAD BEFORE HITTING THE BALL", and not achieve the solid impact position.  If you hinge, the body knows you've opened the club face, so it does everything it can to throw the club head trying to get back to square... but rarely gets there... again, usually the club head is thrown way too soon, flips the club head, closes the face and ball goes left, weak or maybe topped.  So, now the golfer hinges and hangs on to it, so by impact the face is open and the ball is shanked, or blocked right or if they rotate, it slices... hummm, hinging does not sound to productive.

The crux of all this is... if there was a way you could hinge and return back to a powerful, solid, front wrist bowed out, supported impact position consistently, I'd say go for it... but the best tour players in the world hit the ball all over under pressure because of the hinge and throw technique.

Now with my method, since we "rotate" to trap the ball, there is no benefit at all to hinge since we are not going to throw the club head at the ball.  WE CAN SETUP IN THE POWERFUL, SQUARE IMPACT POSITION, then use the shoulders (on the backswing and not let the wrists hinge opening the club face), then use the body on the (downswing), still keeping the face square right back into impact as our turn accelerates all the way to the finish.  We don't turn just to get back to the ball... WE TURN ALL THE WAY TO THE FINISH.  This is where the power is.



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lucky2

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 #9 
Sorry to keep posting, but i just don't get this.  Is hinging the wrists and cocking the wrists the same?  if you did not hinge or cock the wrist, the club shaft would still be completely in line with the left arm with no angle at all between the club shaft and the left arm.  if you  lay hand flat on a table and move the wrist left and right, without lifting it, is that the movement you want, or no movement at all?  From your vidios, I think your left wrist is making this move in order to get the 90 degree angle at the top.  It seems no angle at all would have very limited power.  Thanks again.  Ralph
Ross

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 #10 
In my dialogue, Hinging and Cocking the Wrists are the same, but the wrists can hinge many ways. 

My question is:  Why hinge with an open club face? you can't hold the hinge on the downswing or you'll shank... so you will have to UN-HINGE on the downswing, to get back to a square club face by impact, but most can't return the open club head into the perfect (square face, shaft in line front arm) and END UP FLIPPING! or hanging on and BLOCKING or worse.  Again, why did we hinge then?

We can setup with the shape we need at impact and turn that setup to the top, then turn it through with the body for straight powerful shots (if done correctly).

No, laying the hand flat on a table and moving the wrists is NOT correct [nono].  Placing your front hand on the table like you are shaking hands, with thumb on top, then slightly bowing your wrist out (or hand curls a bit inward toward the body) is correct [wink]. This is subtle!! This is also how impact should feel.  If both hands were on the table with thumbs up (like your grip), the back hand, bent in, angle across the back of your wrist, might increase a bit  at impact. 

Hogan called this Supinate or Supinating.  He taught trying to get to this position during the downswing or lets fix those variables we created on the backswing, with a recovery move with the hands on the downswing.  I say, lets not create variables at all... it all ends up in the same position at impact.  The big difference... Hogan was shortly after impact, going to release the club head with the hands... but, my method uses the body's mass and rotation turning to trap the ball for more reliable control of the club face. We aren't trying to fix the variables on the downswing, supinate at the exact moment of impact and throw the club head... we just turn through holding a nice square club face. 

Now, on a full swing, the club head will release later after impact due to momentum and inertia... (but does not have to on short shots for even better control)


FYI... My swing used hinging and supinating to correct on the downswing, for much of my life, so some of my older videos may have a slight hinge, but I now teach and know that if you can "not hinge", and keep the face square, the direction is awesome and it is much easier to hit the sweet spot.  You can also be powerful if the golfer can learn to wind up correctly and unwind correctly.



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lucky2

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 #11 
Okay .I think I get it. If I bow my left wrist, I can't cock it much. Hope that is what you mean.
Ross

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 #12 
Yes.. you're on to it [smile].  If you start off with some short pitch shots with this idea, you'll hit some of the most solid shots you've ever hit.  You will feel like the back of your front wrist points more "down" (vs. out) on the backswing and ... again points "down" just before impact. 

HINT: you must be turning through impact or the ball will go left (right hander).

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lucky2

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 #13 
Okay .I will work on it. Loving this personal attention. You have given me hope after 45 years of struggling and ununproductive lessons. Thanks again.
Ross

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 #14 
Easy... remember, if you need, a Membership includes (1)  Analysis or Skype Call. You can send me a couple videos to look at, then I can dial in directly on what may be the issue.
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lucky2

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 #15 
Okay. I will try to get it in the ballpark first then send them in. :-)
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